Read Me First!

Reader Advisory
Some of these stories may contain mild profanity, poo humor,  sex talk, and general “TMI” (too much information). The names in these stories have been changed to protect the guilty.

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Comments (39)

AnonymousAugust 4th, 2007 at 5:02 pm

Very nice site – loved following the tales of your Nagymama, my nagyi reminds me much of her. I grew up a lot like you but my grandmother came out in the 50s – they lived quite a life!

Thanks for the great perspective!
Nora @ ohiocritics.com

ShinygrapeAugust 7th, 2007 at 11:23 am

Thank you, Nora! It makes me so happy to hear that people can relate to these stories :)

AnonymousAugust 7th, 2007 at 2:22 pm

Gratula a filmhez!
Olvasni tudsz magyarul?
Itt be van linkelve a videód.
nyuuz.hu

OliviaAugust 30th, 2007 at 4:10 pm

Hi Steph,
I’m from Malaysia(north of Singapore). It is a multiracial country where the Chinese, Indians, Malays and a handful of natives living together in harmony.

I’m a broadcasting student.
I came across your Nagymama video in YouTube while i was looking for my friend’s and my church’s video(research on style, composition, creativity n all).

It’s pretty impressive, what you did in that animation.

Though my grandma is no longer around, watching your video reminds me of all the time i had with her as a kid.

Thanks for sharing your videos n blogs. It really widen my knowledge in Hungarian’s culture.
I had fun reading your blogs n watching your videos. It really brighten up my day.

Thanks again.

Keep it up. Hope to see more of your creation n adventures in the future.

Ciao…(bye-forgotten from which dialect)

ShinygrapeSeptember 6th, 2007 at 12:21 am

Nyuuz -
Yes, I can sort of read Hungarian, but I can’t respond back because I simply cannot write. I only really speak Hungarian to my family, but let me tell you, these online adventures have helped me learn to read a little bit better. I’m very grateful for that :)

-Stephanie

ShinygrapeSeptember 6th, 2007 at 12:30 am

Hi, Olivia! Thanks for your comments! I will keep making videos and writing blogs as long as you guys keep watching & reading them!!

“A handful of natives living together in harmony” – now THAT sound like my kind of place!How do they take to Americans over in Malaysia? I have seen photos before and it is BEAUTIFUL!

AnonymousSeptember 7th, 2007 at 2:30 pm

ciao “fényesszőlő”, /as far as i know that what your name means in hungarian/ great blog, appearently a lot of work, but only a few guests that’s a shame…:-)
Keep it up. Csókolom a nagyit:-)

Na megyek vissza olvasni, most hogy lefeküdt a paraszt szobatársam…

ShinygrapeSeptember 7th, 2007 at 3:32 pm

Anonymous (Sept 7),
I have never heard the word “fényesszőlő – I will ask my mom what it means next time I see her – as long as you promise that it isn’t a dirty word :)

But köszönöm, thank you :) Yes, this blog is a lot of work and is not visited by as many people as, oh, I dunno, MySpace.com or Yahoo.com, BUT I am very happy to say that I have really good readers :P I’ll take the few dozen genuine people that frequent this blog over the millions of hateful people that post racist comments on mainstream sites like YouTube.

If you are reading this, you have pulled yourself away from the “Chocolate Rain” and “and read a site that is “off the beaten path,” which I truly appreciate. And if you like what you see, please take the time to forward it to three close friends, so maybe they can tell three more of THEIR friends, and we can expand our happy little community here. See, I don’t just want to write the stories – I want to read some of yours, too 

-Stephanie

OliviaNovember 14th, 2007 at 10:55 am

How do they take Americans here…?
That is an interesting question. Actually, it all depends on the people here. What they do for a living, how they come to meet an American.

Most of the foreigners are here for visitation. Some were well treated, most were cheated by greedy ‘businessmen’.
But all are welcome to visit, do business and also study heRE.

Anyway, how are you?

AnonymousDecember 25th, 2007 at 12:44 am

I was going to leave comments on all your blogs but there are just too many…I NEED and WANT to see this as a tv show! You guys are cartoons! If it weren’t for the fact that my POlish family was the SAME way, I would think you were nuts! Hope you have a happy holiday and keep on writing,please, I can’t wait til the next goulash episode!

Love,
Katie

AnonymousDecember 25th, 2007 at 12:46 am

PS: Good goulash receipie, too – I tried to make some in the crockpot last week.

-Katie

weezerDecember 26th, 2007 at 4:20 pm

Hi Stephanie, remember me, I had sent an email to Nagymama and asked about szaloncukor… Anyway, I’ve been sharing your Nagymama stories with my sister and she agrees with me (and apparently others) in saying “thank goodness it’s not just OUR family!” I used to tell my friends that we weren’t crazy, just Hungarian…

I can’t commend you enough for starting your American Goulash blog, but most especially for the “Nagymama” movie and your home movies (the one I can relate to the most is ‘In The Kitchen’). It’s wonderful to see that other families have brought their Eastern European beliefs and traditions here with them. It makes for some hilarious moments to see how “da old vays” translate into our modern American lives!

Having said that, I’m also disappointed that so many people have shown you their racist side. Diversity defines who we are and makes things interesting.

I stand behind you, ‘my long-lost sister,’ one thousand percent. Please continue to record your family history and keep us entertained through Nagymama!!!

Szervusz, Lisa

Csilla VasDecember 26th, 2007 at 11:48 pm

Szeretlek!
Te iubesc!
I love you!
Please more!

PatsAnimationDecember 27th, 2007 at 1:08 pm

Haha, I just read a bunch- my favorite was your grandma beating on the purse snatcher from Mcdonald’ses… ha. Merry christmas! Pitching this = awesomeness .

Pat

EdnADecember 27th, 2007 at 4:22 pm

You make me miss my grandma! (we lost her over 15 years ago, but it was like yesterday that she was making goulash)

AliDecember 28th, 2007 at 9:52 am

I know your stories are funny but for some reason they make me cry….but in a good way. I miss my grandma (Mum-Mum), too. You are so lucky to have your Nagy Mama!

christopherDecember 30th, 2007 at 1:15 pm

hey, don’t think that all Romanians hate you – I’m Romanian and German and this is my weekly treat! It’s nice to see someone who can take a step back and laugh and the situation that is sometimes a little strange and uncomfortable. The German side of my family doesn’t get me either. It doesn’ matter where you’re from, sometimes it’s just a generational thing. You’ll be really glad you wrote these stories down some day when you have your own Grandchildren and you know what? They will probably have stories about how weird you are, too (no offense or anything! It’s just a part of life. I know my kids think I’m a total nut and they are 8 and 10)

christopherDecember 30th, 2007 at 1:16 pm

hey, don’t think that all Romanians hate you – I’m Romanian and German and this is my weekly treat! It’s nice to see someone who can take a step back and laugh and the situation that is sometimes a little strange and uncomfortable. The German side of my family doesn’t get me either. It doesn’ matter where you’re from, sometimes it’s just a generational thing. You’ll be really glad you wrote these stories down some day when you have your own Grandchildren and you know what? They will probably have stories about how weird you are, too (no offense or anything! It’s just a part of life. I know my kids think I’m a total nut and they are 8 and 10).

Chris H from P-WayJanuary 4th, 2008 at 2:27 pm

Best blog i have ever read. Keeps me entertained till the very end and always wanting more. My grandmother is Hungarian but never has stories like this. I just subscribed to your site so i never miss another story. I think i have read them all so far. Please keep them coming!!

jimJanuary 8th, 2008 at 9:30 pm

hey, i don’t care whether you make this a tv show, book, or made-for-tv movie, just get this stuff out there. it’s all f@cking gold, girl, you need to make a gift set out of this somehow so i can give it to my mom for x-mas next yr (she doesn’t internet ever)

jJanuary 8th, 2008 at 9:33 pm

Also, what’s the deal with fat? your family is ubsessed with fat, have you noticed that?

AnonymousJanuary 10th, 2008 at 11:58 pm

Oh, now I see why you NEVER answer the phone, e-mails, myspaces, texts, strip-o-grams…THIS is how you spend all your time, glued to the internet. Keep doing it, I’m just raggin’ on yeah.

Dave-O

alexisJanuary 11th, 2008 at 6:32 pm

I think it took me like an hour, but i think I read everything. OMFG, these are so funny. I wish I had funny stories like this, my family is pretty boring. We’re all mutts. White people are so boring. maybe that’s why everyone calls us crackers.

EditJanuary 12th, 2008 at 6:03 am

Love, love,love these stories. It’s sp cool to read that on the other side of the world someone is using the fakanal, and the bowl to cut hair. And the papucs….i have a papucs like that…it’s really comfortable. :D Please keep writing these stories, regardless of the angry comments. Greetings from Transylvania! :)

WendyJanuary 20th, 2008 at 11:32 pm

i love these. these stories are so traumatic that it’s like watching a train wreck. i am a gaper and proud of it.

jerFebruary 18th, 2008 at 1:01 pm

hey, i saw ur cartoon on nicktoons and googled you – glad you have a wierd name so i could find you! thanks for all the funnies!

Paul J.February 19th, 2008 at 2:06 pm

I’ve met this girl in real life, and from what I can tell, she’s completely normal despite her somewhat smothering upbringing. No offense, but I’m still waiting for you to jump off the deep end or something and like you said, turn into the crazy cat lady or something.

AlexFebruary 19th, 2008 at 11:54 pm

I like the title of this blog, I didnt know it was a real thing either before!

gregFebruary 20th, 2008 at 10:50 am

ahaha
hilarious!

carolApril 10th, 2008 at 2:03 pm

You remind me a lot of my niece that passed a few years ago (she had MS, but she had the same quirky sense of humor, even til the end). If there is a collection of your stories i can purchase, pls let me know, keep me on your email lists also, thank you, stefanie.

Lauren SommermenApril 10th, 2008 at 2:49 pm

Came for the recipes, stayed for the stories. Thanks for posting both! Also, FYI, you are the #1 google ranking for “american goulash recipe”, that’s pretty impressive for an independent artist.

jillApril 16th, 2008 at 1:36 pm

I’ve read everything you’ve written here since like August or Sept and I officially have a Non-Lesbian Female Crush on you. We should go steady.

AnonymousApril 17th, 2008 at 3:18 pm

i dont get it..she famous or something? why does everyone read this?i thought this was a supposed to be a online cooking site.

KellyApril 29th, 2008 at 3:33 pm

Very funny!

KarlaJanuary 28th, 2009 at 1:13 pm

very interesting and funny! I, too, come from a different background – but not as different as yours! I’m PA Dutch – raised among Amish buggies. It’s a different world out there, too.

Ashleigh Ullyett WatsonMarch 18th, 2009 at 9:18 am

Love it!

Rose BaillieMarch 18th, 2009 at 9:23 am

It’s always about the paprika

LaszloNovember 23rd, 2009 at 3:10 pm

Hi! So….just watched the video. Very funny and brought back lots of memories. But the kicker came at the end: My last name is Serester too! Could we be related??

shinygrapeDecember 2nd, 2009 at 2:42 pm

Hey, Laszlo!

I have NO IDEA if we are related – part of the reason I am doing this is because I want to find my family on my mother’s side. My grandma apparently had I believe 6 brothers and sisters and all this family back in Hungary/Romania, but she WON’T talk about it! (I’ll blog about that soon)

Nagymama is Karolina Serester – she has a sister named Freda Serester, who later married and changed her name to Freda Fucker (I’m not kidding – in America, they changed it to Freda Falker or maybe Faulker so it wasn’t so profane).

Nagymama married my grandfather in her 40′s – I don’t know what his first name is by his last name was Dancs. I believe she divorced him shortly after he fathers her two children – Ildiko and Sarlota. That is literally ALL I know.

Any of that sound familiar? My mom, aunt Sarlota, and Nagymama came here I guess…1971?

As for the Yuhas name, who knows. It means “Shepard”, which is a popular last name, even here in the USA. It’s also spelled Juhasz and Yuhasz, so it’s too hard to track down actual relatives (and I’m not sure if I want to. But I’ll get into that some other day, too).

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